Cont: Content: Coaching Model, Counselling Coaching, Counseling Coaching, Coach, Coaching Model, Mentor, Mentoring, Coaching, business coach mentoring, business mentoring, business mentor, mentoring and coaching, business coaching model, executive coaching, counseling, hr coaches, hr coaching

HR Coaching News
       
Some misconceptions about coaching ©
              (extracts from new book 'Behavioral Coaching' by Zeus and Skiffington - published by McGraw-Hill .2004)
Workplace counselling as coaching: 
Many organizations and Human Resources Personnel report that they utilize coaching when in fact, what they are employing is an outdated, traditional counselling model.  Research and our experience show the following similarities and differences between the two models. 
  >   Both involve a client-practitioner model that focuses on the performance and functioning of the individual
  >   Both build rapport and use advanced listening, questioning and reflecting skills
  >   Both use goal-setting and action planning  

However, the differences between the two approaches are significant. These include: 

  >  The counselling model generally follows a remedial approach that emphasizes deficits and the problems involved with not meeting a set, required standard of conduct. Coaching emphasizes empowerment, strengths and achievements and how the coachee can leverage these to grow and develop.

  >  There is a greater power differential in counselling. The employee has the problem and the manager/counsellor is an expert who will “fix” him or her. Coaches are not experts, but guides and resource providers.

  >  Counselling focuses on exploring reactive behaviours and changing these. Coaching is proactive, it aims to recognize and solve problems before they arise.

  >  Whereas counselling is needs based and occasional, coaching involves ongoing development. 

The coach as expert:
Coaches are not experts in all areas of business. Of course, some coaches who work in organizational settings may be experts in business but this is not generally the case. The coach is an expert in the use of behavioural change tools and techniques. Coaches are resource people rather than experts/gurus. They assess the individual or organization’s needs. Then, drawing from their extensive coaching toolkit and research, they provide clients with the necessary resources to enable them to meet their stated goals.  

The coach as specialist:
Coaching involves bringing about profound changes in thinking and behaviour and it is not something that can be ‘an add on’ to any practitioner’s existing services. Although coaches may have received training in coaching skills, they need continuous training and development of these skills to be truly effective. 

Coaching and mentoring:
Mentoring and coaching are sometimes used interchangeably. In some organizations, mentoring is being relabelled as coaching although the old style of passing on knowledge, skills and experience remains unchanged.  In fact, it is generally agreed that successful mentors employ a range of coaching skills.  

Yet, there are certain differences between the role of a coach and that of a mentor. Some of these include: 

  >  Mentors tend to be recognized experts within a particular field or industry

  >  Mentoring tends to be more career focussed than coaching which also focusses on interpersonal and life issues

  >  Mentors draw more from their own personal experiences and successes whereas coaching operates within a framework that draws the solutions from the coachee.

  >  Mentors tends to represent the standards, values and vision of the organization. Coaching is more intent on exploring the individual’s values and aligning these with the organization to enhance the individual’s progress and advancement.

Coaching is a profession, and like all established professions, requires extensive training and supervision. Coaching is change and change is a psychological process. The coach has to understand the psychological aspects of coaching and be confident and competent to deal with these. Coaches especially require one-to-one supervised training by a clinician in the instruction and practice of the use of validated tools and techniques to effect sustained behavioural change. Our coach training and specialty workshops grew out of the recognized need for coaches to have individualized training and practice in working with various coaching techniques (drawn from the behavioural sciences) such as: dialoging, working with emotions, self-awareness as well as challenging and confronting self-limiting beliefs and behaviours etc. 

        Latest Relevant Articles:
        Evidence Based Approach to Coaching  
    
  Evidence Based Coaching versus Belief Coaching 
       Validated Coaching Models, Tools and Techniques

- Coaching Credentialing issues ..more

- Master Coach Certification Course -Content .. more

 

Home | Faculty | Coaching Certification | Master Coach Course Content  | Course Registration Form |
 
Books etc | Coaching Tools | Articles/News

Content: Coaching Model, Counselling Coaching, Counseling Coaching, Coach, Coaching Model, Mentor, Mentoring, Coaching, business coach mentoring, business mentoring, business mentor, mentoring and coaching, business coaching model, executive coaching, counseling, hr coaches, hr coaching